Banner are offering Apprenticeships

When James joined Banner on an apprenticeship as a 17-year-old school leaver, he had minimal workplace experience. Three years on, James has developed a wide range of skills, gained qualifications and is now one of our full time sales support administrators.

James has learned from supportive colleagues who have helped him to develop in his role, learn all about our business and grow in confidence.

With Banner you’re supported and empowered to take on new opportunities and work towards valuable qualifications. This means James is being fully supported as he studies towards levels one, two and three of an NVQ in Administration.

Solution

Banner works with local colleges to give both short and longer term placements to students.

Work experience at Banner helps people discover their strengths through working in a range of admin roles and deciding where their futures may lie. We let people have week and month long ‘taster’ experiences of the different areas of business admin so they’re able to decide where they want to take their careers.

Wherever our people are at in their careers, there’s always the opportunity to learn something new. With Banner you can build new skills and pursue new qualifications.

We have colleagues taking NVQs in Management and in Business Administration, and when our people switch between departments, they’re able to study whatever they need to, to help them in their new role. So if you move from sales to admin, it’s likely you’ll take an NVQ or similar qualification to give you the head start you need.

Result

  • James got a chance to gain work experience
  • He has developed a wide range of skills
  • Banner has around 33 apprentices within the business currently who they are helping


Banner Celebrates National Stationery Week

Banner celebrates National Stationery Week #WritingMatters

National Stationery Week is here and, at Banner, we are celebrating the week by giving away five stationery bundles, to recognise the importance and benefits of hand writing. #WritingMatters.

National Stationery week

National Stationery week is here from 29th April to the 5th May so fill your pencil cases, sharpen your pencils, grab a clean sheet of paper and get ready to celebrate.

For this week it’s time to get creative and colourful with your favourite pens and pencils to celebrate, and with so many different varieties of stationery you can be as outlandish, stylish or bold as you want by getting creative with colour and celebrating your stationery.

Why is writing by hand so important?
Today we are surrounded by technology, in a day and age where every letter is at our finger tips with the press of a button – why should we use pens and paper. We are constantly being warned that due to the excessive use of technology simple things like learning to write as a child is becoming harder with paediatric doctors warning children are finding it hard to even hold a pencil.

However, during a study at the Guardian’s roundtable event on 27th February, the people involved chose to use the classic pen and paper instead of a laptop, this is most likely due to the idea that in a group situation using a laptop to type would have been considered rude on a social standard.
Writing is a key part in our development as children cannot fully contemplate the world without creating a mental image of it, which is why teachers encourage you to draw in the sand or water when you are in primary school as it embeds in your mind – Naveed Idress of Feversham Primary Academy stated: “You never know what an A is unless you’ve physically drawn it.”

This is why writing is so important in our lives, as without it we wouldn’t necessarily know how to spell or read, because on programs such as Word it will always correct your Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar.

So, pick up a pen or pencil and be creative!

Find out more
If you ‘d like to know more about what Banner are up to? Subscribe to our blog to get regular updates.

Entry terms and conditions: Entry is open to residents of the UK except employees (and their families) of EVO Group Ltd. Entrant(s) must be aged 18 or over. One entry per person. Proof of identity and age may be required. Use of a false name or address will result in disqualification. Entries that are incomplete, illegible or indecipherable will not be valid and deemed void. All entries must be made directly by the person entering the competition. Entries made online using methods generated by a script, macro or the use of automated devices will be void. No responsibility can be accepted for entries lost, damaged or delayed in the post, or due to computer error in transit. Participants will be entered into the draw to win a stationery bundle. The prize is as stated, is not transferable to another individual and no cash or other alternatives will be offered. The draw will be independently supervised. The winner agrees for their name, job title and company to be published on our website www.Banneruk.com and on Banner’s social media channels (LinkedIn and Twitter). The winner is responsible for any tax liability which may arise from receipt of a prize. Your entry into the prize draw will be taken as confirmation of your full agreement to these terms and conditions. Entry closes: 05/05/19.


Eco friendly packaging

In a bid to reduce single-use plastics by 30% before 2020 across our business, we’re pleased to announce that we’ve introduced Eco-friendly packaging throughout our warehouses, for small pick parcels.

 

At Banner, we deliver an impressive 6,000 small pick parcels a week, that’s around 30,000 a month and 312,000 per year! We’re proud that these parcels now contain a cushion of recycled cardboard instead of harmful plastics.

Reducing our impact on the environment
By recycling our used or damaged cardboard boxes into shock absorbent netted material, for use as void fill instead of plastic, we’re now shredding and recycling over 360 tonnes of cardboard per year; that’s equivalent to around the weight of 72 Asian Elephants! This new initiative will reduce our impact on the environment and the amount of waste produced.

What our customers have to say
The eco-friendly packaging launched this year, following a successful pilot initiative, with customer feedback showing just how important recycling is to our customers.

Over 93% of customers, who took part in our pilot, were either satisfied or very satisfied with the new packaging. 80% of customers said they always recycle packaging from their deliveries and 94% said recycling is extremely important to them.

Not only will this reduce Banners carbon footprint but also our customers too, because it’s easier to recycle and dispose of.

Commitment to CSR
Craig Varey, Managing Director at Banner says: “Driving down the use of single-use plastics within Banner is a big focus for us because we recognise the impact single-use plastic has on the environment.

We are committed to the delivery of our CSR strategy and operate across four key pillars, which cover; Our Natural Environment, Our Supply Chain, Our Communities and Our People. This year we’re expanding on the investments and commitments that we have already been making for several years now.”

Sustainable products from Banner

With Banner you can meet not only your operational and efficiency targets, but also your environmental ones with our range of sustainable products. From hot drink cups and lids to water cups and cutlery, Banner’s range of PLA (Polylactic Acid) products naturally degrade when exposed to the environment.


Wholesaler VOW Re-affirms Commitment to Putting Re-sellers at Core of It's Business By Appointing New Board

VOW has reaffirmed its commitment to a strategy based on putting resellers at the core of its business by appointing a new board to maximise delivery.

VOW has reaffirmed its commitment to a strategy based on putting resellers at the core of its business by appointing a new board to maximise delivery.

Announcing the new leadership team, Adrian Butler, managing director of the UK’s largest business products and facilities supplies wholesaler, part of the EVO group of companies, said its formation was a “hugely significant development for our organisation”. He added that the new board brought “real focus, expertise and experience” to the company.

In addition to Adrian, the board’s members are: Lisa Hainsworth (sales operations director); Andrew Stacey (merchandising and marketing director); Martin Weedall (operations director); Thomas Barber (commercial director); Nikki Todd (customer experience director); and Cheryl Lamont (managing director of VOW’s managed services division).

Lisa has two decades’ experience in the business supplies industry and has joined VOW from global technology company Xerox, where she worked for three years as European sales operations director.

Andrew, who has been in the industry since 1989, has held several roles within EVO, latterly that of group merchandising and marketing director. He will now focus fully on driving VOW’s evolving product and customer proposition.

Martin, who has over 27 years’ industry experience, has held a series of senior positions within VOW’s operations, running regional depots across the country before most recently having a more customer-facing role as national sales director. VOW believes Martin’s strong understanding of operations and customer needs will play a key part in ensuring its service proposition fully meets resellers’ requirements.

Thomas, a chartered accountant, was latterly head of commercial finance with the EVO group. His new role will be complemented by that of new marketing director Helen Wade, who will assist resellers to drive and promote their businesses effectively.

Nikki, whose industry career began in 1990, was previously director of VOW’s fulfilment channel – encompassing services for national and online resellers, IT resellers and contract stationers. In her new post, Nikki will focus fully on VOW’s end-to-end customer proposition, by simplifying processes and making resellers’ lives easier.

Cheryl, who has worked in the business supplies sector since 1997, will head VOW’s managed services division, a fully outsourced service proposition. She will ensure its customer proposition is in line with reseller needs.

VOW announced late last year that its strategy was based on becoming a world-class wholesaler. It said it would achieve this by improving resellers’ experience of the organisation, creating opportunities to sell more products and being easier to deal with through innovation.  

Commenting on the new VOW board, Adrian said: “We’re really excited about this hugely significant development for our organisation. This new leadership team brings real focus, expertise and experience, which strengthen VOW considerably and puts us in an even better position to deliver on our strategy, ensuring we continue to concentrate completely on our customers’ needs.

“The VOW board now has complete autonomy in the day-to-day running of the company.”

Adrian explained the reason for this empowerment was that EVO understood its separate businesses knew their customers best and in the modern marketplace, needed to make decisions and respond to their needs quickly.    

Looking forward, Adrian said: “The appointment of the new board will lead directly to many important initiatives in the months ahead, as the directors all have their own joined-up plans – the changes they want to introduce which will bring us even closer to resellers. These projects will include streamlining our organisation in some key aspects, improving our speed of response and introducing ground-breaking customer service innovations.

“A good example of these changes will be the new sales structure, which we’ll announce shortly.”


Calm over the horizon

Many years ago, I worked for my parents who own a video production company. Because it is a family business, you inevitably end up wearing many hats and being the czar of many different jobs. I mainly managed projects and worked as a video editor. On production, there were times that I was called on to work as an audio tech and was made to wear headphones on long production days. In those days, having a really good set of headphones that picked up every nuance of sound was essential to making sure the client got what they needed.

First impressions.

Naturally, my first impression of these headphones is based off of the look of them. They have a classic over-the-ear style that is highlighted by a blue LED light that indicates the power for the noise canceling. The padding on the ear pieces seems adequate for extended usage periods.

They are wired headphones, but the 3.5mm stereo mini-plug cable is detachable. Something else I noticed right of the bat was the very nice carrying case that comes with them. It has a hard plastic exterior with a soft cloth interior that helps to protect the surface of the headphones from scratches. I never truly appreciated cases for headphones until I started carrying them from place-to-place. Now I can’t imagine not having a case.

A perfect fit.

Once I gave the headphones a thorough once-over exam, I tried them on. As I mentioned, they have a classic over-the-ear style and just looking at them, the padding on the ear pieces seem adequate and the peak of the headband seemed to be a bit lacking, but you don’t really know comfort unless you try on the product. So, I slipped the headphones on and found them to be exquisitely comfortable.

Quality.

Now that I had the headphones on my head, I was finally ready to plug and play some music. I plugged the provided cable into the jack on the headphones and then the one on my iPhone 6. Then I called up Pandora. I tend to have a very eclectic music purview and have many stations set up for different moods. From John Williams to Fallout Boy, the sound quality of these headphones was remarkable. There is an amazing depth of sound and incredible highs and lows that make listening to music a truly breathtaking experience.

It’s safe to say that because of my unique professional experiences, I’ve tested out a lot of headphones.

In order to test how voices sounded, and the overall art of sound mixing, I pulled up Netflix on my iPad Air 2 and watched a few minutes of a movie to hear all the nuances of the film. None of them were lost. In fact, I ended up hearing sounds that I hadn’t heard before. Echoes…birds chirping…wind blowing through trees…breathing of the characters…it was very impressive what the headphones ended up bringing out for me.

I would highly recommend these to any sound mixing specialist.


Inspired by clouds

Take your time.

I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It runs about $1300. It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms. The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger.

When it dies, swap them all.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.

Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky.

— Rabindranath Tagore

Breathe the world.

I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It runs about $1300. It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms. The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger. When it dies, swap them all.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.

Heavy hearts, like heavy clouds in the sky, are best relieved by the letting of a little water.

— Christopher Morley

Enjoy the morning.

The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger. When it dies, swap them all.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever. I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It runs about $1300.

It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms.

There are no rules of architecture for a castle in the clouds and this is real.

— Gilbert K. Chesterton

Free your mind.

The best way to get better at photography is start by taking your camera everywhere. If you leave your house, your camera leaves with you. The only exception is if you’re planning for a weekend bender — then probably leave it at home. Other than that, always have it slung over your shoulder. It would probably help to get an extra battery to carry in your pocket. I’ve got three batteries. One in my camera, one in my pocket, one in the charger. When it dies, swap them all.

I’ve got a Fujifilm X100s. It runs about $1300. It’s easily the best camera I’ve ever owned. I take care of it as best as I can, but I don’t let taking care of it impact the photography. Let me elaborate on that a bit better. You’ll get better at each section of what we talked about slowly. And while you do, you’ll be amazed at how much easier it all is and how the habit forms.

For me, the most important part of improving at photography has been sharing it. Sign up for an Exposure account, or post regularly to Tumblr, or both. Tell people you’re trying to get better at photography. Talk about it. When you talk about it, other people get excited about it. They’ll come on photo walks with you. They’ll pose for portraits. They’ll buy your prints, zines, whatever.

Photography is better shared.


Make it clean and simple

Create your header preset in just few clicks.

Just the other day I happened to wake up early. That is unusual for an engineering student. After a long time I could witness the sunrise. I could feel the sun rays falling on my body. Usual morning is followed by hustle to make it to college on time. This morning was just another morning yet seemed different.

Witnessing calm and quiet atmosphere, clear and fresh air seemed like a miracle to me. I wanted this time to last longer since I was not sure if I would be able to witness it again, knowing my habit of succumbing to schedule. There was this unusual serenity that comforted my mind. It dawned on me, how distant I had been from nature. Standing near the compound’s gate, feeling the moistness that the air carried, I thought about my life so far.

This is what has happened to us. We want the things we have been doing forcefully to fail. And then maybe people around us would let us try something else or our dreams. We are accustomed to live by everyone else’s definition of success. We punish people for the things they are passionate about, just because we were unable to do the same at some point in our life.

I was good at academics, so decisions of my life had been pretty simple and straight. Being pretty confident I would make it to the best junior college of my town in the first round itself, never made me consider any other option. I loved psychology since childhood, but engineering was the safest option. Being born in a middle class family, thinking of risking your career to make it to medical field was not sane. I grew up hearing ‘Only doctor’s children can afford that field’ and finally ended up believing it. No one around me believed in taking risks. Everyone worshiped security. I grew up doing the same.

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‘Being in the top will only grant you a good life’ has been the mantra of my life. But at times, I wish I was an average student. I wish decisions would have not been so straightforward. Maybe I would have played cricket- the only thing I feel passionate about. Or maybe I would have studied literature (literature drives me crazy). Isn’t that disappointing- me wishing to be bad at academics. It’s like at times I hate myself for the stuff I am good at.

I feel like these concrete buildings have sucked our desires and our dreams. We are so used to comfort that compromise seems like a taboo. We have lost faith in ourselves. If we can make through it right now, we can do the same in the days to come. You only need a desire to survive and nothing more- not money or cars or designer clothes.

Staying locked up in four walls have restricted our thinking. I feel like our limited thinking echoes through this wall. We are so used to schedules and predictable life that we have successfully suppressed our creative side.

When you step out of these four walls on a peaceful morning, you realize how much nature has to offer to you. Its boundless. Your thoughts, worries, deadlines won’t resonate here. Everything will flow away along with the wind. And you will realize every answer you had been looking for, was always known to you.

It would mean a lot to me if you recommend this article and help me improve. I would love to know your thoughts!


When you are alone

You will remember the people more than the place.

Talking to randos is the norm. I’ll never forget the conversation with the aquarium fisherman, forest ranger, and women at the Thai market. It’s refreshing to compare notes on life with people from vastly different backgrounds. When you are alone for days or weeks at a time, you eventually become drawn to people.

When you meet fellow travelers, you’ll find they are also filled with a similar sense of adventure and curiosity about the world. Five days of friendship on the road is like five months of friendship at home. It’s the experiences that bond you together, not the place. A rule I followed that worked well: be the first to initiate conversation. I met some incredible people by simply being the first to talk.

Make a radical change in your lifestyle and begin to boldly do things which you may previously never have thought of doing, or been too hesitant to attempt. But once you become accustomed to such a life you will see its full meaning and its incredible beauty.

Travel can be affordable.

Long term travel is different than a luxury vacation. The point is to see the world, not stay in a 5-star hotel. During the trip, I stayed on a strict budget. The goal was to spend no more than $33 per day on accommodations. After a year, I was able to spend only $26.15 per day by booking through HostelWorld and Airbnb. When I wanted to meet people, I’d stay in a shared room at a hostel. When I wanted to be alone, I’d book a private room with Airbnb.

Take the cost of your rent or mortgage + food per month and divide it by 30. This is how much it costs per day to live at home. You will find that it’s possible to travel the world for roughly the same amount. Or, if you live in an expensive city like San Francisco, far less.

English is a universal language.

I was surprised how many people spoke English (apparently 1.8 billion people worldwide). Places where English was less prevalent, I made an effort to learn a handful of words and phrases in the local language. Even though it’s passable, I do desire to learn another language fluently. You can only take the conversation so far when all you can say is: “¿Esto contiene gluten?”

It’s possible to communicate a lot without saying a word. For instance, I left my phone at a restaurant in Chile. I pointed at the table where I was sitting, put my hand to my ear like a phone, then shrugged — 2 minutes later, my phone had been retrieved.

Trust your intuition.

I learned to trust that tiny voice in my head a bit more. When you are alone in a foreign country and your phone is dead, you are forced to trust your intuition. Is this neighborhood safe to walk around? Is this person someone I should interact with? Am I heading the right direction? Intuition is like a muscle. The more you use it, the stronger it becomes. It’s feels like a sixth sense when you’re able to read between the lines of a situation.

The world is endless. The world’s a tiny neighborhood. My fav people are the ones who can hold two impossible ideas in their heads.


Real time design tools

Just the other day I happened to wake up early. That is unusual for an engineering student. After a long time I could witness the sunrise. I could feel the sun rays falling on my body. Usual morning is followed by hustle to make it to college on time. This morning was just another morning yet seemed different.

Witnessing calm and quiet atmosphere, clear and fresh air seemed like a miracle to me. I wanted this time to last longer since I was not sure if I would be able to witness it again, knowing my habit of succumbing to schedule. There was this unusual serenity that comforted my mind. It dawned on me, how distant I had been from nature. Standing near the compound’s gate, feeling the moistness that the air carried, I thought about my life so far.

I was good at academics, so decisions of my life had been pretty simple and straight. Being pretty confident I would make it to the best junior college of my town in the first round itself, never made me consider any other option. I loved psychology since childhood, but engineering was the safest option. Being born in a middle class family, thinking of risking your career to make it to medical field was not sane. I grew up hearing ‘Only doctor’s children can afford that field’ and finally ended up believing it. No one around me believed in taking risks. Everyone worshiped security. I grew up doing the same.

This is what has happened to us. We want the things we have been doing forcefully to fail. And then maybe people around us would let us try something else or our dreams. We are accustomed to live by everyone else’s definition of success. We punish people for the things they are passionate about, just because we were unable to do the same at some point in our life.

I feel like these concrete buildings have sucked our desires and our dreams. We are so used to comfort that compromise seems like a taboo. We have lost faith in ourselves. If we can make through it right now, we can do the same in the days to come. You only need a desire to survive and nothing more- not money or cars or designer clothes.

Staying locked up in four walls have restricted our thinking. I feel like our limited thinking echoes through this wall. We are so used to schedules and predictable life that we have successfully suppressed our creative side.

When you step out of these four walls on a peaceful morning, you realize how much nature has to offer to you. Its boundless. Your thoughts, worries, deadlines won’t resonate here. Everything will flow away along with the wind. And you will realize every answer you had been looking for, was always known to you.

It would mean a lot to me if you recommend this article and help me improve. I would love to know your thoughts!


Stumbled the concept

Stumbled the concept

Patrick FroggattBy Patrick Froggatt3rd March 20177 Minutes

If you’re not sure how much time you are actually spending on various tasks, use a tool like Rescue Time (their free version is excellent!) which runs in the background and tracks where your time is being spent. It can even send you weekly reports so you know exactly how much time you wasted on Facebook, or spent in your email inbox! You can assign different websites or programs/applications on a scale of very distracting to very productive, so you can see at a glance things like: which days of the week you’re most productive, which times of the day you’re most productive, and the sites on which you’re spending the most distracting time. I stumbled upon the concept of margin while reading a post by Michael Hyatt, which led me to design my ideal week.

Richard Swenson, M.D. (who wrote the book: Margin: Restoring Emotional, Physical, Financial, and Time Reserves to Overloaded Lives) describes margin like this:

Last year I wrote about why booking too far in advance can be dangerous for your business, and this concept of margin so eloquently captures what I had recognized had been my problem: I was so booked up with clients that I wasn’t leaving any margin for error, growth, planning, or reflection. I wasn’t really growing my business in a sustainable way; I was just booking one client after the next. At the time this seemed like a good thing: doesn’t growing my business mean getting more clients?

What if instead of booking up to 100% capacity (which more often than not ends up being closer to 120%), we only booked up to an 80% capacity?

What if we left more room for growth (personal or professional) and stopped being one with “busy-ness”?
I spent nearly a year turning down every new project (and even getting rid of old ones) so that I could reduce my workload, build in more margin, and create what is now Digital Strategy School. It takes time to build margin into your schedule.

What could you accomplish with 20% more time?

Write a book. Create a program. Update your contracts and proposals (which has been on your to-do list for how long..?) Spend more time with your family. Go above and beyond for a client. Learn something new. Actually follow through on the things that have been nagging at you for a long time.

When you design your ideal week, you start to see that the time you think you have is often not in alignment with how much time you actually have.

After designing my ideal week, I had a much clearer idea of how to create a framework for my week that would empower me to feel more focused by theming days of the week, and even parts of the day. SO simple, I know. Some of you have been doing this for ages and you’re already a pro, and some of you who saw my schedule said “woah, that’s so rigid, I need more flexibility!”

Structure enables flexibility.

If you’re not sure how much time you are actually spending on various tasks, use a tool like Rescue Time (their free version is excellent!) which runs in the background and tracks where your time is being spent. It can even send you weekly reports so you know exactly how much time you wasted on Facebook, or spent in your email inbox! You can assign different websites or programs/applications on a scale of very distracting to very productive, so you can see at a glance things like: which days of the week you’re most productive, which times of the day you’re most productive, and the sites on which you’re spending the most distracting time. Turns out I’m consistently “in the zone” around 3pm in the afternoon; so instead of trying to tackle highly creative work first thing in the morning (when my brain is barely functioning), I handle it in the afternoon, when I know I’m at my peak!

Creating more margin has been game-changing for my business.
What would be possible for yours?


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